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Colorado

Adult Education Innovations

State Contacts


State Agency

Danielle Ongart 
Executive Director 
Colorado Department of Education, Office of Adult Education Initiatives
201 East Colfax Avenue, Room 301
Denver, CO 80203
Phone: (303) 866-6206 Fax: (303) 866-6599
Email: Ongart_D@cde.state.co.us
Website: cde.state.co.us/index_adult.htm

State Association

George O’Clair
President
Colorado Adult Education Professional Association (CAEPA)
Colorado
Phone: 970-542-6268
Email: george.oclair@morgancc.edu
Website: caepa.org

 

State Reports on Adult Education


 

Colorado

State Data on Adult Education


 

Colorado

State Innovations


 

Colorado

Interactive English Curriculum
Intercambio Uniting Communities 

The Challenge

The immigrant experience is difficult and complex. Both recent arrivals and long-term residents are often isolated by language and cultural barriers. By learning English, understanding cultural norms, and forming personal connections immigrants can change their lives—and the lives of their families— for years to come. Learning English is essential, but immigrants also need the confidence to use their English and create personal connections.

The Solution

Intercambio’s “Interactive English” curriculum meets specific needs of adult immigrants for increased confidence speaking English in real-life situations. Our curriculum promotes personal connections by making English teaching accessible to all community members, regardless of experience. Real-life topics such as employment, transportation, finances, health, and schools are integrated into lessons. We share materials and resources with adult ELL programs in hundreds of cities.

The Outcome

Intercambio has supported 10,000 adult immigrants in Colorado and 100,000 nationally. In a 2016 survey of students, half were earning more money after attending classes, and the average was $3 more per hour (median family income is $25,000). 81% of students increased confidence speaking English; 90% felt confident after classes. Almost two-thirds of those with children were very involved in their education. Parents reported higher high school graduation rates than the area averages for Latino students.